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Criminal Summons in Florida

| Sep 9, 2020 | Criminal

What happens upon receipt of a Criminal Summons in Florida? In some jurisdictions, the use of a Criminal Summons was part of criminal justice even prior to COVID. Some people are surprised to receive a Summons, while others are made aware of a criminal investigation and may be expecting it or relieved to receive a Summons instead of being arrested.

When the State of Florida files criminal charges and, presuming a person is not arrested on the scene of an alleged crime, there are two ways to notify the defendant. A criminal defendant is notified either by an arrest or by issuing a Summons, also called a Notice to Appear. When a person receives a Summons, they must respond or else the Judge will issue an arrest warrant. Most people should view receiving a Summons as better than being arrested.

Typically, the Sheriff’s Office will not discuss a Summons over the telephone, and someone has to physically appear at the Sheriff’s Office. A lawyer may be able to respond to the summons on behalf of the summonsed individual, which can be beneficial or just bring peace of mind. A person receiving a Summons in criminal cases should respond to the Summons by themselves or by a lawyer instead of choosing to be arrested. Upon responding to a Summons, an arrest can be avoided. As for timing and all the rules, the service of a Summons functions the same as an arrest. For example, it starts the clock of speedy trial.

In any criminal case, the accused is entitled to have a lawyer appointed, however, lawyers are not appointed to the accused during the investigation, arrest or Summons portions of the case. A Public Defender is assigned by the Court after the Summons is served or an arrest is made. For assistance responding to a Summons or any criminal case, please click, call, or fill out the form.

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